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Northspur

Robert Hunt

I never intended to get into film editing. Four years ago, I was interested in graphic design and traditional animation. One day, I was asked to make a short animated film and it was during the process of doing that when I first discovered editing. As an editor, it’s my job to help directors realize their creative vision. I’m also able to put my own ideas into the film, helping shape the story and the pace of a film.

In some cases, I start editing to sound effects and music tracks, for instance, in the “Telling Lies” project, I cut shots to the rhythm of music, allowing music to provide formal and rhythmic continuity between shots. However, this concept isn’t suitable for every film; the typical starting point in understanding the pace of a film is working alongside the sound production team in order to sync the tracks.

A number of things need to be done at the beginning of a film edit. “Syncing up” is a first step in the process because the shots are often taken separately from the sound. Editing without sound is a learned skill – especially when there is no dialogue – which requires matching sound with the filmed image, choosing the desired takes and putting it all together.

Choosing what frame(s) to use at a particular point in the film is an important element of pace-timing. During the first cut, I consider questions such as: where in a sequence should a particular cutaway or close-up be positioned for a maximum impact? In “working with acting projects, there are a lot of interactions between two main characters.” (Kate and Ray). First, I cut scenes, taking out redundant pauses of actors for “brew” dialogue. Each editor should learn to distinguish performances from error (dead space) and it’s not as simple as following the action to its conclusion. It’s much more complex. When cutting into the performance, I pay attention to the sequence, being careful not to break the rhythm established by the characters in the scene.

I never intended to get into film editing. Four years ago, I was interested in graphic design and traditional animation. One day, I was asked to make a short animated film and it was during the process of doing that when I first discovered editing. As an editor, it’s my job to help directors realize their creative vision. I’m also able to put my own ideas into the film, helping shape the story and the pace of a film.

In some cases, I start editing to sound effects and music tracks, for instance, in the “Telling Lies” project, I cut shots to the rhythm of music, allowing music to provide formal and rhythmic continuity between shots. However, this concept isn’t suitable for every film; the typical starting point in understanding the pace of a film is working alongside the sound production team in order to sync the tracks. .

A number of things need to be done at the beginning of a film edit. “Syncing up” is a first step in the process because the shots are often taken separately from the sound. Editing without sound is a learned skill – especially when there is no dialogue – which requires matching sound with the filmed image, choosing the desired takes and putting it all together.
Choosing what frame(s) to use at a particular point in the film is an important element of pace-timing. During the first cut, I consider questions such as: where in a sequence should a particular cutaway or close-up be positioned for a maximum impact? In “working with acting projects, there are a lot of interactions between two main characters.” (Kate and Ray). First, I cut scenes, taking out redundant pauses of actors for “brew” dialogue. Each editor should learn to distinguish performances from error (dead space) and it’s not as simple as following the action to its conclusion. It’s much more complex. When cutting into the performance, I pay attention to the sequence, being careful not to break the rhythm established by the characters in the scene.

I never intended to get into film editing. Four years ago, I was interested in graphic design and traditional animation. One day, I was asked to make a short animated film and it was during the process of doing that when I first discovered editing. As an editor, it’s my job to help directors realize their creative vision. I’m also able to put my own ideas into the film, helping shape the story and the pace of a film.

In some cases, I start editing to sound effects and music tracks, for instance, in the “Telling Lies” project, I cut shots to the rhythm of music, allowing music to provide formal and rhythmic continuity between shots. However, this concept isn’t suitable for every film; the typical starting point in understanding the pace of a film is working alongside the sound production team in order to sync the tracks.

A number of things need to be done at the beginning of a film edit. “Syncing up” is a first step in the process because the shots are often taken separately from the sound. Editing without sound is a learned skill – especially when there is no dialogue – which requires matching sound with the filmed image, choosing the desired takes and putting it all together.

Choosing what frame(s) to use at a particular point in the film is an important element of pace-timing. During the first cut, I consider questions such as: where in a sequence should a particular cutaway or close-up be positioned for a maximum impact? In “working with acting projects, there are a lot of interactions between two main characters.” (Kate and Ray). First, I cut scenes, taking out redundant pauses of actors for “brew” dialogue. Each editor should learn to distinguish performances from error (dead space) and it’s not as simple as following the action to its conclusion. It’s much more complex. When cutting into the performance, I pay attention to the sequence, being careful not to break the rhythm established by the characters in the scene.

18
Northspur

Alicia beck

According to the Casting Society of America (CSA), casting directors work directly for studios and production companies, and their agencies function like human resource departments. Casting directors typically work on a freelance basis, charging a set fee for each production in which they’re involved. They must possess strong interpersonal and communication abilities, because they work closely with producers, directors, writers, casting agents, and talent agencies. Being a casting director also requires a flexible schedule, because the job requires long hours and often frequent travel to find talent or meet with producers, directors, and other key production staff.

Casting directors read scripts and collaborate with producers, directors, and writers to create breakdown notices, which are brief descriptions of the physical attributes, skills, and experience sought in actors to portray particular characters. With the aid of casting assistants, casting directors submit these breakdown notices to agents and talent agencies. Casting directors then receive actors’ headshots and resumes, which they must sift through to select the most qualified actors and schedule them for auditions, often with the help of casting assistants.

Depending on the size and scope of a production, a casting director may hold an initial round of auditions and personally decide which actors to call back for the producer and director. After each round of auditions, the casting director becomes responsible for notifying and scheduling selected actors for additional rounds of auditions, until a final casting decision is made. Although the decision of which actors to cast is ultimately up to directors or producers, casting agents often directly influence the decision of which actor is cast for a particular role.

Formal education isn’t required to become a casting director, but experience is necessary. Many casting directors begin their careers as casting assistants to CSA casting directors, by apprenticing for casting agents or as interns for talent agencies and production companies. Individuals seeking careers as casting directors can increase their opportunities by completing bachelor’s degree programs or taking classes in theater or film production, acting, or business.

According to PayScale.com, talent directors earned a median salary of $103,277 as of October 2016. Although the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS, www.bls.gov) does not provide information specific to the field of casting direction, the BLS did project that the employment of producers and directors would likely grow by about 9% between 2014 and 2024, a rate that’s faster than the average predicted for all occupations.

A casting director finds the right actor for the role they’re seeking to fill, and they need strong interpersonal skills and the ability to work long hours. They primarily learn on the job as an assistant or intern, and a degree in theater, film production or business may be helpful in this field. Producers and directors, including casting directors, can expect to see a faster-than-average increase in job opportunities through 2024.

According to the Casting Society of America (CSA), casting directors work directly for studios and production companies, and their agencies function like human resource departments. Casting directors typically work on a freelance basis, charging a set fee for each production in which they’re involved. They must possess strong interpersonal and communication abilities, because they work closely with producers, directors, writers, casting agents, and talent agencies. Being a casting director also requires a flexible schedule, because the job requires long hours and often frequent travel to find talent or meet with producers, directors, and other key production staff.

Casting directors read scripts and collaborate with producers, directors, and writers to create breakdown notices, which are brief descriptions of the physical attributes, skills, and experience sought in actors to portray particular characters. With the aid of casting assistants, casting directors submit these breakdown notices to agents and talent agencies. Casting directors then receive actors’ headshots and resumes, which they must sift through to select the most qualified actors and schedule them for auditions, often with the help of casting assistants.

Depending on the size and scope of a production, a casting director may hold an initial round of auditions and personally decide which actors to call back for the producer and director. After each round of auditions, the casting director becomes responsible for notifying and scheduling selected actors for additional rounds of auditions, until a final casting decision is made. Although the decision of which actors to cast is ultimately up to directors or producers, casting agents often directly influence the decision of which actor is cast for a particular role.

Formal education isn’t required to become a casting director, but experience is necessary. Many casting directors begin their careers as casting assistants to CSA casting directors, by apprenticing for casting agents or as interns for talent agencies and production companies. Individuals seeking careers as casting directors can increase their opportunities by completing bachelor’s degree programs or taking classes in theater or film production, acting, or business.

According to PayScale.com, talent directors earned a median salary of $103,277 as of October 2016. Although the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS, www.bls.gov) does not provide information specific to the field of casting direction, the BLS did project that the employment of producers and directors would likely grow by about 9% between 2014 and 2024, a rate that’s faster than the average predicted for all occupations.

A casting director finds the right actor for the role they’re seeking to fill, and they need strong interpersonal skills and the ability to work long hours. They primarily learn on the job as an assistant or intern, and a degree in theater, film production or business may be helpful in this field. Producers and directors, including casting directors, can expect to see a faster-than-average increase in job opportunities through 2024.

17
Northspur

Jane Beck

I never intended to get into film editing. Four years ago, I was interested in graphic design and traditional animation. One day, I was asked to make a short animated film and it was during the process of doing that when I first discovered editing. As an editor, it’s my job to help directors realize their creative vision. I’m also able to put my own ideas into the film, helping shape the story and the pace of a film.

In some cases, I start editing to sound effects and music tracks, for instance, in the “Telling Lies” project, I cut shots to the rhythm of music, allowing music to provide formal and rhythmic continuity between shots. However, this concept isn’t suitable for every film; the typical starting point in understanding the pace of a film is working alongside the sound production team in order to sync the tracks. .

A number of things need to be done at the beginning of a film edit. “Syncing up” is a first step in the process because the shots are often taken separately from the sound. Editing without sound is a learned skill – especially when there is no dialogue – which requires matching sound with the filmed image, choosing the desired takes and putting it all together.

Choosing what frame(s) to use at a particular point in the film is an important element of pace-timing. During the first cut, I consider questions such as: where in a sequence should a particular cutaway or close-up be positioned for a maximum impact? In “working with acting projects, there are a lot of interactions between two main characters.” (Kate and Ray). First, I cut scenes, taking out redundant pauses of actors for “brew” dialogue. Each editor should learn to distinguish performances from error (dead space) and it’s not as simple as following the action to its conclusion. It’s much more complex. When cutting into the performance, I pay attention to the sequence, being careful not to break the rhythm established by the characters in the scene.

I never intended to get into film editing. Four years ago, I was interested in graphic design and traditional animation. One day, I was asked to make a short animated film and it was during the process of doing that when I first discovered editing. As an editor, it’s my job to help directors realize their creative vision. I’m also able to put my own ideas into the film, helping shape the story and the pace of a film.

In some cases, I start editing to sound effects and music tracks, for instance, in the “Telling Lies” project, I cut shots to the rhythm of music, allowing music to provide formal and rhythmic continuity between shots. However, this concept isn’t suitable for every film; the typical starting point in understanding the pace of a film is working alongside the sound production team in order to sync the tracks. .

A number of things need to be done at the beginning of a film edit. “Syncing up” is a first step in the process because the shots are often taken separately from the sound. Editing without sound is a learned skill – especially when there is no dialogue – which requires matching sound with the filmed image, choosing the desired takes and putting it all together.
Choosing what frame(s) to use at a particular point in the film is an important element of pace-timing. During the first cut, I consider questions such as: where in a sequence should a particular cutaway or close-up be positioned for a maximum impact? In “working with acting projects, there are a lot of interactions between two main characters.” (Kate and Ray). First, I cut scenes, taking out redundant pauses of actors for “brew” dialogue. Each editor should learn to distinguish performances from error (dead space) and it’s not as simple as following the action to its conclusion. It’s much more complex. When cutting into the performance, I pay attention to the sequence, being careful not to break the rhythm established by the characters in the scene.

I never intended to get into film editing. Four years ago, I was interested in graphic design and traditional animation. One day, I was asked to make a short animated film and it was during the process of doing that when I first discovered editing. As an editor, it’s my job to help directors realize their creative vision. I’m also able to put my own ideas into the film, helping shape the story and the pace of a film.

In some cases, I start editing to sound effects and music tracks, for instance, in the “Telling Lies” project, I cut shots to the rhythm of music, allowing music to provide formal and rhythmic continuity between shots. However, this concept isn’t suitable for every film; the typical starting point in understanding the pace of a film is working alongside the sound production team in order to sync the tracks. .

A number of things need to be done at the beginning of a film edit. “Syncing up” is a first step in the process because the shots are often taken separately from the sound. Editing without sound is a learned skill – especially when there is no dialogue – which requires matching sound with the filmed image, choosing the desired takes and putting it all together.
Choosing what frame(s) to use at a particular point in the film is an important element of pace-timing. During the first cut, I consider questions such as: where in a sequence should a particular cutaway or close-up be positioned for a maximum impact? In “working with acting projects, there are a lot of interactions between two main characters.” (Kate and Ray). First, I cut scenes, taking out redundant pauses of actors for “brew” dialogue. Each editor should learn to distinguish performances from error (dead space) and it’s not as simple as following the action to its conclusion. It’s much more complex. When cutting into the performance, I pay attention to the sequence, being careful not to break the rhythm established by the characters in the scene.

I never intended to get into film editing. Four years ago, I was interested in graphic design and traditional animation. One day, I was asked to make a short animated film and it was during the process of doing that when I first discovered editing. As an editor, it’s my job to help directors realize their creative vision. I’m also able to put my own ideas into the film, helping shape the story and the pace of a film.

In some cases, I start editing to sound effects and music tracks, for instance, in the “Telling Lies” project, I cut shots to the rhythm of music, allowing music to provide formal and rhythmic continuity between shots. However, this concept isn’t suitable for every film; the typical starting point in understanding the pace of a film is working alongside the sound production team in order to sync the tracks. .

A number of things need to be done at the beginning of a film edit. “Syncing up” is a first step in the process because the shots are often taken separately from the sound. Editing without sound is a learned skill – especially when there is no dialogue – which requires matching sound with the filmed image, choosing the desired takes and putting it all together.

Choosing what frame(s) to use at a particular point in the film is an important element of pace-timing. During the first cut, I consider questions such as: where in a sequence should a particular cutaway or close-up be positioned for a maximum impact? In “working with acting projects, there are a lot of interactions between two main characters.” (Kate and Ray). First, I cut scenes, taking out redundant pauses of actors for “brew” dialogue. Each editor should learn to distinguish performances from error (dead space) and it’s not as simple as following the action to its conclusion. It’s much more complex. When cutting into the performance, I pay attention to the sequence, being careful not to break the rhythm established by the characters in the scene.

I never intended to get into film editing. Four years ago, I was interested in graphic design and traditional animation. One day, I was asked to make a short animated film and it was during the process of doing that when I first discovered editing. As an editor, it’s my job to help directors realize their creative vision. I’m also able to put my own ideas into the film, helping shape the story and the pace of a film.

In some cases, I start editing to sound effects and music tracks, for instance, in the “Telling Lies” project, I cut shots to the rhythm of music, allowing music to provide formal and rhythmic continuity between shots. However, this concept isn’t suitable for every film; the typical starting point in understanding the pace of a film is working alongside the sound production team in order to sync the tracks. .

A number of things need to be done at the beginning of a film edit. “Syncing up” is a first step in the process because the shots are often taken separately from the sound. Editing without sound is a learned skill – especially when there is no dialogue – which requires matching sound with the filmed image, choosing the desired takes and putting it all together.

Choosing what frame(s) to use at a particular point in the film is an important element of pace-timing. During the first cut, I consider questions such as: where in a sequence should a particular cutaway or close-up be positioned for a maximum impact? In “working with acting projects, there are a lot of interactions between two main characters.” (Kate and Ray). First, I cut scenes, taking out redundant pauses of actors for “brew” dialogue. Each editor should learn to distinguish performances from error (dead space) and it’s not as simple as following the action to its conclusion. It’s much more complex. When cutting into the performance, I pay attention to the sequence, being careful not to break the rhythm established by the characters in the scene.

17
Northspur

Film Producer

An overview of the business of filmmaking is taught in this course. Students examine the role of the producer in shepherding the film from project development to completion and distribution. This film producer class also covers film and television studios operations, working with talent agents and movie financing. Negotiating contracts and other legal aspects of the entertainment industry are also introduced.

This course is designed for film producers to experience the roles of major players in filmmaking, such as the cinematographer, director, lighting director, scriptwriter and editor. This class includes an introduction to the filmmaking process and may be divided into separate courses for preproduction, production and postproduction.

In this course students learn the differences between independent films and films made by major studios. A focus is placed on finding creative solutions to common problems faced by independent producers, such as financing and distribution. This film producer class also discusses the culture of Hollywood and the struggle between creating film as art and making a film that is profitable.

Student film producers learn to obtain financing and manage costs for large film productions. Financial standards for the film industry and cost control measures used by current productions are covered. Details of distribution, marketing and production costs and are explored in depth.

Copyright, contracts, trademarks and intellectual property are among the legal topics covered in this film production course. Future film producers become familiar with laws that impact and protect their work. Students also review conditions commonly found in film industry contracts.

A film producer’s role changes from producing a motion picture to producing a marketing campaign once the film is completed. Students in this course learn to sell their film to the viewing public by developing a strategy for timing and distribution of the film, as well as create effective advertising.

An overview of the business of filmmaking is taught in this course. Students examine the role of the producer in shepherding the film from project development to completion and distribution. This film producer class also covers film and television studios operations, working with talent agents and movie financing. Negotiating contracts and other legal aspects of the entertainment industry are also introduced.

This course is designed for film producers to experience the roles of major players in filmmaking, such as the cinematographer, director, lighting director, scriptwriter and editor. This class includes an introduction to the filmmaking process and may be divided into separate courses for preproduction, production and postproduction.

In this course students learn the differences between independent films and films made by major studios. A focus is placed on finding creative solutions to common problems faced by independent producers, such as financing and distribution. This film producer class also discusses the culture of Hollywood and the struggle between creating film as art and making a film that is profitable.

Student film producers learn to obtain financing and manage costs for large film productions. Financial standards for the film industry and cost control measures used by current productions are covered. Details of distribution, marketing and production costs and are explored in depth.

Copyright, contracts, trademarks and intellectual property are among the legal topics covered in this film production course. Future film producers become familiar with laws that impact and protect their work. Students also review conditions commonly found in film industry contracts.

A film producer’s role changes from producing a motion picture to producing a marketing campaign once the film is completed. Students in this course learn to sell their film to the viewing public by developing a strategy for timing and distribution of the film, as well as create effective advertising.

An overview of the business of filmmaking is taught in this course. Students examine the role of the producer in shepherding the film from project development to completion and distribution. This film producer class also covers film and television studios operations, working with talent agents and movie financing. Negotiating contracts and other legal aspects of the entertainment industry are also introduced.

This course is designed for film producers to experience the roles of major players in filmmaking, such as the cinematographer, director, lighting director, scriptwriter and editor. This class includes an introduction to the filmmaking process and may be divided into separate courses for preproduction, production and postproduction.

In this course students learn the differences between independent films and films made by major studios. A focus is placed on finding creative solutions to common problems faced by independent producers, such as financing and distribution. This film producer class also discusses the culture of Hollywood and the struggle between creating film as art and making a film that is profitable.

Student film producers learn to obtain financing and manage costs for large film productions. Financial standards for the film industry and cost control measures used by current productions are covered. Details of distribution, marketing and production costs and are explored in depth.

Copyright, contracts, trademarks and intellectual property are among the legal topics covered in this film production course. Future film producers become familiar with laws that impact and protect their work. Students also review conditions commonly found in film industry contracts.

A film producer’s role changes from producing a motion picture to producing a marketing campaign once the film is completed. Students in this course learn to sell their film to the viewing public by developing a strategy for timing and distribution of the film, as well as create effective advertising.

An overview of the business of filmmaking is taught in this course. Students examine the role of the producer in shepherding the film from project development to completion and distribution. This film producer class also covers film and television studios operations, working with talent agents and movie financing. Negotiating contracts and other legal aspects of the entertainment industry are also introduced.

This course is designed for film producers to experience the roles of major players in filmmaking, such as the cinematographer, director, lighting director, scriptwriter and editor. This class includes an introduction to the filmmaking process and may be divided into separate courses for preproduction, production and postproduction.

In this course students learn the differences between independent films and films made by major studios. A focus is placed on finding creative solutions to common problems faced by independent producers, such as financing and distribution. This film producer class also discusses the culture of Hollywood and the struggle between creating film as art and making a film that is profitable.

Student film producers learn to obtain financing and manage costs for large film productions. Financial standards for the film industry and cost control measures used by current productions are covered. Details of distribution, marketing and production costs and are explored in depth.

Copyright, contracts, trademarks and intellectual property are among the legal topics covered in this film production course. Future film producers become familiar with laws that impact and protect their work. Students also review conditions commonly found in film industry contracts.

A film producer’s role changes from producing a motion picture to producing a marketing campaign once the film is completed. Students in this course learn to sell their film to the viewing public by developing a strategy for timing and distribution of the film, as well as create effective advertising.

15
Northspur

Script Writer

A formal degree is not required to become a script supervisor; on-the-job training or apprenticeships are a more common practice. However, script supervisors may enroll in a film school, attend workshops or become assistants to experienced script supervisors to learn this trade. These schools and workshops will teach individuals about industry-related topics such as pre-production, continuity, directorial styles, on-set protocol and blocking strategies for scenes. Also, individuals learn how to work with cameras, develop essential shots and deal with actor improvisation to scripts.

Becoming an assistant to an experienced script supervisor may provide valuable training and experience, including a hands-on understanding of the day-to-day challenges facing professional script supervisors. Individuals interested in this job should be strong communicators, and organized, observant, detail-oriented and responsible.

A majority of the television and film industry is located in Los Angeles and New York, and aspiring script supervisors may have to relocate to find employment. The amount of work available for script supervisors varies greatly, and may depend on an individual’s reputation, the extent of their contacts in the industry, the demand for script supervisors and the availability of projects. An option for script writers may be to seek work as television commercials to gain more experience and exposure.

Along with ensuring continuity and accuracy of a script, these workers also record information about each take. This includes the length of the scene, the take number, as well as notes on a variety of thing such as setting props, wardrobes, makeup and hairstyle.

The salaries of script supervisors are based by the job and experience. Some script supervisors are members of unions, which sets the wages for its members. Some script supervisors may work for production companies such as the International Alliance of Theatrical and Stage Employees.

Script supervisors work with the writers and on set to ensure filming or taping is consistent with the script. Most script supervisors obtain experience and training either during work or through an apprenticeship, although degrees in film are available and may be beneficial.

A formal degree is not required to become a script supervisor; on-the-job training or apprenticeships are a more common practice. However, script supervisors may enroll in a film school, attend workshops or become assistants to experienced script supervisors to learn this trade. These schools and workshops will teach individuals about industry-related topics such as pre-production, continuity, directorial styles, on-set protocol and blocking strategies for scenes. Also, individuals learn how to work with cameras, develop essential shots and deal with actor improvisation to scripts.

Becoming an assistant to an experienced script supervisor may provide valuable training and experience, including a hands-on understanding of the day-to-day challenges facing professional script supervisors. Individuals interested in this job should be strong communicators, and organized, observant, detail-oriented and responsible.

A majority of the television and film industry is located in Los Angeles and New York, and aspiring script supervisors may have to relocate to find employment. The amount of work available for script supervisors varies greatly, and may depend on an individual’s reputation, the extent of their contacts in the industry, the demand for script supervisors and the availability of projects. An option for script writers may be to seek work as television commercials to gain more experience and exposure.

Along with ensuring continuity and accuracy of a script, these workers also record information about each take. This includes the length of the scene, the take number, as well as notes on a variety of thing such as setting props, wardrobes, makeup and hairstyle.

The salaries of script supervisors are based by the job and experience. Some script supervisors are members of unions, which sets the wages for its members. Some script supervisors may work for production companies such as the International Alliance of Theatrical and Stage Employees.

Script supervisors work with the writers and on set to ensure filming or taping is consistent with the script. Most script supervisors obtain experience and training either during work or through an apprenticeship, although degrees in film are available and may be beneficial.

A formal degree is not required to become a script supervisor; on-the-job training or apprenticeships are a more common practice. However, script supervisors may enroll in a film school, attend workshops or become assistants to experienced script supervisors to learn this trade. These schools and workshops will teach individuals about industry-related topics such as pre-production, continuity, directorial styles, on-set protocol and blocking strategies for scenes. Also, individuals learn how to work with cameras, develop essential shots and deal with actor improvisation to scripts.

Becoming an assistant to an experienced script supervisor may provide valuable training and experience, including a hands-on understanding of the day-to-day challenges facing professional script supervisors. Individuals interested in this job should be strong communicators, and organized, observant, detail-oriented and responsible.

A majority of the television and film industry is located in Los Angeles and New York, and aspiring script supervisors may have to relocate to find employment. The amount of work available for script supervisors varies greatly, and may depend on an individual’s reputation, the extent of their contacts in the industry, the demand for script supervisors and the availability of projects. An option for script writers may be to seek work as television commercials to gain more experience and exposure.

Along with ensuring continuity and accuracy of a script, these workers also record information about each take. This includes the length of the scene, the take number, as well as notes on a variety of thing such as setting props, wardrobes, makeup and hairstyle.

The salaries of script supervisors are based by the job and experience. Some script supervisors are members of unions, which sets the wages for its members. Some script supervisors may work for production companies such as the International Alliance of Theatrical and Stage Employees.

Script supervisors work with the writers and on set to ensure filming or taping is consistent with the script. Most script supervisors obtain experience and training either during work or through an apprenticeship, although degrees in film are available and may be beneficial.

A formal degree is not required to become a script supervisor; on-the-job training or apprenticeships are a more common practice. However, script supervisors may enroll in a film school, attend workshops or become assistants to experienced script supervisors to learn this trade. These schools and workshops will teach individuals about industry-related topics such as pre-production, continuity, directorial styles, on-set protocol and blocking strategies for scenes. Also, individuals learn how to work with cameras, develop essential shots and deal with actor improvisation to scripts.

Becoming an assistant to an experienced script supervisor may provide valuable training and experience, including a hands-on understanding of the day-to-day challenges facing professional script supervisors. Individuals interested in this job should be strong communicators, and organized, observant, detail-oriented and responsible.

A majority of the television and film industry is located in Los Angeles and New York, and aspiring script supervisors may have to relocate to find employment. The amount of work available for script supervisors varies greatly, and may depend on an individual’s reputation, the extent of their contacts in the industry, the demand for script supervisors and the availability of projects. An option for script writers may be to seek work as television commercials to gain more experience and exposure.

Along with ensuring continuity and accuracy of a script, these workers also record information about each take. This includes the length of the scene, the take number, as well as notes on a variety of thing such as setting props, wardrobes, makeup and hairstyle.

The salaries of script supervisors are based by the job and experience. Some script supervisors are members of unions, which sets the wages for its members. Some script supervisors may work for production companies such as the International Alliance of Theatrical and Stage Employees.

Script supervisors work with the writers and on set to ensure filming or taping is consistent with the script. Most script supervisors obtain experience and training either during work or through an apprenticeship, although degrees in film are available and may be beneficial.

A formal degree is not required to become a script supervisor; on-the-job training or apprenticeships are a more common practice. However, script supervisors may enroll in a film school, attend workshops or become assistants to experienced script supervisors to learn this trade. These schools and workshops will teach individuals about industry-related topics such as pre-production, continuity, directorial styles, on-set protocol and blocking strategies for scenes. Also, individuals learn how to work with cameras, develop essential shots and deal with actor improvisation to scripts.

Becoming an assistant to an experienced script supervisor may provide valuable training and experience, including a hands-on understanding of the day-to-day challenges facing professional script supervisors. Individuals interested in this job should be strong communicators, and organized, observant, detail-oriented and responsible.

A majority of the television and film industry is located in Los Angeles and New York, and aspiring script supervisors may have to relocate to find employment. The amount of work available for script supervisors varies greatly, and may depend on an individual’s reputation, the extent of their contacts in the industry, the demand for script supervisors and the availability of projects. An option for script writers may be to seek work as television commercials to gain more experience and exposure.

Along with ensuring continuity and accuracy of a script, these workers also record information about each take. This includes the length of the scene, the take number, as well as notes on a variety of thing such as setting props, wardrobes, makeup and hairstyle.

The salaries of script supervisors are based by the job and experience. Some script supervisors are members of unions, which sets the wages for its members. Some script supervisors may work for production companies such as the International Alliance of Theatrical and Stage Employees.

Script supervisors work with the writers and on set to ensure filming or taping is consistent with the script. Most script supervisors obtain experience and training either during work or through an apprenticeship, although degrees in film are available and may be beneficial.

18
Northspur

Actor

Actors depict characters in stories using their voices, appearances, bodies and gestures. They can work in movies, television, commercials, theater, theme parks and clubs. While working as an actor, they perform for entertainment and informational purposes. Actors can play main characters or supporting roles, and they must audition for casting directors to land a part.

After securing a role, the actor studies the script to learn about the character and memorize the speaking parts. Sometimes scripts change during rehearsals, and actors may find themselves memorizing new lines. Some parts may require actors to sing, dance or perform stunts.

Actors work under the director who advises them on how to portray the characters. To bring the character to life, actors change their voices, dialects, facial expressions and other traits. In addition to wearing costumes, actors use props, which they must learn to use appropriately.

Actors rehearse often, especially for live events where there is little room for error. Long and variable working hours are sometimes required, as well as travel. Actors sometimes have to endure unpleasant working conditions, such as bad weather, harsh stage lights, heavy costuming and little preparation time.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the national mean hourly income for actors as of May 2015 was $37.47. However, work isn’t always steady, and some actors have second jobs to supplement their income. Additionally, actors’ salaries are not created equal. The highest-paid and most successful actors make significantly more than most actors.

Unionized actors belong to organizations that negotiate minimum wages for actors. The Screen Actors Guild (SAG) represents actors working in film, television, commercials and other media forms. SAG members meet certain eligibility requirements and pay an initiation fee and monthly dues in exchange for collective bargaining and residual payment on qualifying work. SAG members can also take advantage of benefits like contributions to health and retirement plans, professional workshops and job opportunities.

Live theater actors can join the Actor’s Equity Association (AEA) to receive unionized collective bargaining benefits. AEA also provides its members with other benefits, such as tax assistance, discounts and employer-paid health insurance.

Actors portray characters on film or in plays. From 2014 to 2024 actors can expect a 10% rate of job growth, which is faster than average when compared to all occupations. Aspiring actors can consider formal training in theater arts to help develop their skills.

Actors depict characters in stories using their voices, appearances, bodies and gestures. They can work in movies, television, commercials, theater, theme parks and clubs. While working as an actor, they perform for entertainment and informational purposes. Actors can play main characters or supporting roles, and they must audition for casting directors to land a part.

After securing a role, the actor studies the script to learn about the character and memorize the speaking parts. Sometimes scripts change during rehearsals, and actors may find themselves memorizing new lines. Some parts may require actors to sing, dance or perform stunts.

Actors work under the director who advises them on how to portray the characters. To bring the character to life, actors change their voices, dialects, facial expressions and other traits. In addition to wearing costumes, actors use props, which they must learn to use appropriately.

Actors rehearse often, especially for live events where there is little room for error. Long and variable working hours are sometimes required, as well as travel. Actors sometimes have to endure unpleasant working conditions, such as bad weather, harsh stage lights, heavy costuming and little preparation time.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the national mean hourly income for actors as of May 2015 was $37.47. However, work isn’t always steady, and some actors have second jobs to supplement their income. Additionally, actors’ salaries are not created equal. The highest-paid and most successful actors make significantly more than most actors.

Unionized actors belong to organizations that negotiate minimum wages for actors. The Screen Actors Guild (SAG) represents actors working in film, television, commercials and other media forms. SAG members meet certain eligibility requirements and pay an initiation fee and monthly dues in exchange for collective bargaining and residual payment on qualifying work. SAG members can also take advantage of benefits like contributions to health and retirement plans, professional workshops and job opportunities.

Live theater actors can join the Actor’s Equity Association (AEA) to receive unionized collective bargaining benefits. AEA also provides its members with other benefits, such as tax assistance, discounts and employer-paid health insurance.

Actors portray characters on film or in plays. From 2014 to 2024 actors can expect a 10% rate of job growth, which is faster than average when compared to all occupations. Aspiring actors can consider formal training in theater arts to help develop their skills.

Actors depict characters in stories using their voices, appearances, bodies and gestures. They can work in movies, television, commercials, theater, theme parks and clubs. While working as an actor, they perform for entertainment and informational purposes. Actors can play main characters or supporting roles, and they must audition for casting directors to land a part.

After securing a role, the actor studies the script to learn about the character and memorize the speaking parts. Sometimes scripts change during rehearsals, and actors may find themselves memorizing new lines. Some parts may require actors to sing, dance or perform stunts.

Actors work under the director who advises them on how to portray the characters. To bring the character to life, actors change their voices, dialects, facial expressions and other traits. In addition to wearing costumes, actors use props, which they must learn to use appropriately.

Actors rehearse often, especially for live events where there is little room for error. Long and variable working hours are sometimes required, as well as travel. Actors sometimes have to endure unpleasant working conditions, such as bad weather, harsh stage lights, heavy costuming and little preparation time.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the national mean hourly income for actors as of May 2015 was $37.47. However, work isn’t always steady, and some actors have second jobs to supplement their income. Additionally, actors’ salaries are not created equal. The highest-paid and most successful actors make significantly more than most actors.

Unionized actors belong to organizations that negotiate minimum wages for actors. The Screen Actors Guild (SAG) represents actors working in film, television, commercials and other media forms. SAG members meet certain eligibility requirements and pay an initiation fee and monthly dues in exchange for collective bargaining and residual payment on qualifying work. SAG members can also take advantage of benefits like contributions to health and retirement plans, professional workshops and job opportunities.

Live theater actors can join the Actor’s Equity Association (AEA) to receive unionized collective bargaining benefits. AEA also provides its members with other benefits, such as tax assistance, discounts and employer-paid health insurance.

Actors portray characters on film or in plays. From 2014 to 2024 actors can expect a 10% rate of job growth, which is faster than average when compared to all occupations. Aspiring actors can consider formal training in theater arts to help develop their skills.

Actors depict characters in stories using their voices, appearances, bodies and gestures. They can work in movies, television, commercials, theater, theme parks and clubs. While working as an actor, they perform for entertainment and informational purposes. Actors can play main characters or supporting roles, and they must audition for casting directors to land a part.

After securing a role, the actor studies the script to learn about the character and memorize the speaking parts. Sometimes scripts change during rehearsals, and actors may find themselves memorizing new lines. Some parts may require actors to sing, dance or perform stunts.

Actors work under the director who advises them on how to portray the characters. To bring the character to life, actors change their voices, dialects, facial expressions and other traits. In addition to wearing costumes, actors use props, which they must learn to use appropriately.

Actors rehearse often, especially for live events where there is little room for error. Long and variable working hours are sometimes required, as well as travel. Actors sometimes have to endure unpleasant working conditions, such as bad weather, harsh stage lights, heavy costuming and little preparation time.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the national mean hourly income for actors as of May 2015 was $37.47. However, work isn’t always steady, and some actors have second jobs to supplement their income. Additionally, actors’ salaries are not created equal. The highest-paid and most successful actors make significantly more than most actors.

Unionized actors belong to organizations that negotiate minimum wages for actors. The Screen Actors Guild (SAG) represents actors working in film, television, commercials and other media forms. SAG members meet certain eligibility requirements and pay an initiation fee and monthly dues in exchange for collective bargaining and residual payment on qualifying work. SAG members can also take advantage of benefits like contributions to health and retirement plans, professional workshops and job opportunities.

Live theater actors can join the Actor’s Equity Association (AEA) to receive unionized collective bargaining benefits. AEA also provides its members with other benefits, such as tax assistance, discounts and employer-paid health insurance.

Actors portray characters on film or in plays. From 2014 to 2024 actors can expect a 10% rate of job growth, which is faster than average when compared to all occupations. Aspiring actors can consider formal training in theater arts to help develop their skills.

17
Northspur

Sean Lopez

I never intended to get into film editing. Four years ago, I was interested in graphic design and traditional animation. One day, I was asked to make a short animated film and it was during the process of doing that when I first discovered editing. As an editor, it’s my job to help directors realize their creative vision. I’m also able to put my own ideas into the film, helping shape the story and the pace of a film.

In some cases, I start editing to sound effects and music tracks, for instance, in the “Telling Lies” project, I cut shots to the rhythm of music, allowing music to provide formal and rhythmic continuity between shots. However, this concept isn’t suitable for every film; the typical starting point in understanding the pace of a film is working alongside the sound production team in order to sync the tracks. .

A number of things need to be done at the beginning of a film edit. “Syncing up” is a first step in the process because the shots are often taken separately from the sound. Editing without sound is a learned skill – especially when there is no dialogue – which requires matching sound with the filmed image, choosing the desired takes and putting it all together.

Choosing what frame(s) to use at a particular point in the film is an important element of pace-timing. During the first cut, I consider questions such as: where in a sequence should a particular cutaway or close-up be positioned for a maximum impact? In “working with acting projects, there are a lot of interactions between two main characters.” (Kate and Ray). First, I cut scenes, taking out redundant pauses of actors for “brew” dialogue. Each editor should learn to distinguish performances from error (dead space) and it’s not as simple as following the action to its conclusion. It’s much more complex. When cutting into the performance, I pay attention to the sequence, being careful not to break the rhythm established by the characters in the scene.

I never intended to get into film editing. Four years ago, I was interested in graphic design and traditional animation. One day, I was asked to make a short animated film and it was during the process of doing that when I first discovered editing. As an editor, it’s my job to help directors realize their creative vision. I’m also able to put my own ideas into the film, helping shape the story and the pace of a film.

In some cases, I start editing to sound effects and music tracks, for instance, in the “Telling Lies” project, I cut shots to the rhythm of music, allowing music to provide formal and rhythmic continuity between shots. However, this concept isn’t suitable for every film; the typical starting point in understanding the pace of a film is working alongside the sound production team in order to sync the tracks.

A number of things need to be done at the beginning of a film edit. “Syncing up” is a first step in the process because the shots are often taken separately from the sound. Editing without sound is a learned skill – especially when there is no dialogue – which requires matching sound with the filmed image, choosing the desired takes and putting it all together.

Choosing what frame(s) to use at a particular point in the film is an important element of pace-timing. During the first cut, I consider questions such as: where in a sequence should a particular cutaway or close-up be positioned for a maximum impact? In “working with acting projects, there are a lot of interactions between two main characters.” (Kate and Ray). First, I cut scenes, taking out redundant pauses of actors for “brew” dialogue. Each editor should learn to distinguish performances from error (dead space) and it’s not as simple as following the action to its conclusion. It’s much more complex. When cutting into the performance, I pay attention to the sequence, being careful not to break the rhythm established by the characters in the scene.

I never intended to get into film editing. Four years ago, I was interested in graphic design and traditional animation. One day, I was asked to make a short animated film and it was during the process of doing that when I first discovered editing. As an editor, it’s my job to help directors realize their creative vision. I’m also able to put my own ideas into the film, helping shape the story and the pace of a film.

In some cases, I start editing to sound effects and music tracks, for instance, in the “Telling Lies” project, I cut shots to the rhythm of music, allowing music to provide formal and rhythmic continuity between shots. However, this concept isn’t suitable for every film; the typical starting point in understanding the pace of a film is working alongside the sound production team in order to sync the tracks.

A number of things need to be done at the beginning of a film edit. “Syncing up” is a first step in the process because the shots are often taken separately from the sound. Editing without sound is a learned skill – especially when there is no dialogue – which requires matching sound with the filmed image, choosing the desired takes and putting it all together.

Choosing what frame(s) to use at a particular point in the film is an important element of pace-timing. During the first cut, I consider questions such as: where in a sequence should a particular cutaway or close-up be positioned for a maximum impact? In “working with acting projects, there are a lot of interactions between two main characters.” (Kate and Ray). First, I cut scenes, taking out redundant pauses of actors for “brew” dialogue. Each editor should learn to distinguish performances from error (dead space) and it’s not as simple as following the action to its conclusion. It’s much more complex. When cutting into the performance, I pay attention to the sequence, being careful not to break the rhythm established by the characters in the scene.

16
Northspur

Brian Foster

According to the Casting Society of America (CSA), casting directors work directly for studios and production companies, and their agencies function like human resource departments. Casting directors typically work on a freelance basis, charging a set fee for each production in which they’re involved. They must possess strong interpersonal and communication abilities, because they work closely with producers, directors, writers, casting agents, and talent agencies. Being a casting director also requires a flexible schedule, because the job requires long hours and often frequent travel to find talent or meet with producers, directors, and other key production staff.

Casting directors read scripts and collaborate with producers, directors, and writers to create breakdown notices, which are brief descriptions of the physical attributes, skills, and experience sought in actors to portray particular characters. With the aid of casting assistants, casting directors submit these breakdown notices to agents and talent agencies. Casting directors then receive actors’ headshots and resumes, which they must sift through to select the most qualified actors and schedule them for auditions, often with the help of casting assistants.

Depending on the size and scope of a production, a casting director may hold an initial round of auditions and personally decide which actors to call back for the producer and director. After each round of auditions, the casting director becomes responsible for notifying and scheduling selected actors for additional rounds of auditions, until a final casting decision is made. Although the decision of which actors to cast is ultimately up to directors or producers, casting agents often directly influence the decision of which actor is cast for a particular role.

Formal education isn’t required to become a casting director, but experience is necessary. Many casting directors begin their careers as casting assistants to CSA casting directors, by apprenticing for casting agents or as interns for talent agencies and production companies. Individuals seeking careers as casting directors can increase their opportunities by completing bachelor’s degree programs or taking classes in theater or film production, acting, or business.

According to PayScale.com, talent directors earned a median salary of $103,277 as of October 2016. Although the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS, www.bls.gov) does not provide information specific to the field of casting direction, the BLS did project that the employment of producers and directors would likely grow by about 9% between 2014 and 2024, a rate that’s faster than the average predicted for all occupations.

A casting director finds the right actor for the role they’re seeking to fill, and they need strong interpersonal skills and the ability to work long hours. They primarily learn on the job as an assistant or intern, and a degree in theater, film production or business may be helpful in this field. Producers and directors, including casting directors, can expect to see a faster-than-average increase in job opportunities through 2024.

According to the Casting Society of America (CSA), casting directors work directly for studios and production companies, and their agencies function like human resource departments. Casting directors typically work on a freelance basis, charging a set fee for each production in which they’re involved. They must possess strong interpersonal and communication abilities, because they work closely with producers, directors, writers, casting agents, and talent agencies. Being a casting director also requires a flexible schedule, because the job requires long hours and often frequent travel to find talent or meet with producers, directors, and other key production staff.

Casting directors read scripts and collaborate with producers, directors, and writers to create breakdown notices, which are brief descriptions of the physical attributes, skills, and experience sought in actors to portray particular characters. With the aid of casting assistants, casting directors submit these breakdown notices to agents and talent agencies. Casting directors then receive actors’ headshots and resumes, which they must sift through to select the most qualified actors and schedule them for auditions, often with the help of casting assistants.

Depending on the size and scope of a production, a casting director may hold an initial round of auditions and personally decide which actors to call back for the producer and director. After each round of auditions, the casting director becomes responsible for notifying and scheduling selected actors for additional rounds of auditions, until a final casting decision is made. Although the decision of which actors to cast is ultimately up to directors or producers, casting agents often directly influence the decision of which actor is cast for a particular role.

Formal education isn’t required to become a casting director, but experience is necessary. Many casting directors begin their careers as casting assistants to CSA casting directors, by apprenticing for casting agents or as interns for talent agencies and production companies. Individuals seeking careers as casting directors can increase their opportunities by completing bachelor’s degree programs or taking classes in theater or film production, acting, or business.

According to PayScale.com, talent directors earned a median salary of $103,277 as of October 2016. Although the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS, www.bls.gov) does not provide information specific to the field of casting direction, the BLS did project that the employment of producers and directors would likely grow by about 9% between 2014 and 2024, a rate that’s faster than the average predicted for all occupations.

A casting director finds the right actor for the role they’re seeking to fill, and they need strong interpersonal skills and the ability to work long hours. They primarily learn on the job as an assistant or intern, and a degree in theater, film production or business may be helpful in this field. Producers and directors, including casting directors, can expect to see a faster-than-average increase in job opportunities through 2024.

16
Northspur

Jessie Clarke

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, camera operators usually hold a bachelor’s degree in film or a similar field. Courses in these programs typically go over the equipment, shooting techniques and the general processes of film shooting. Aspiring camera operators could also go to film school to learn about the artistic or creative aspects of cinematography. In addition, some colleges and universities offer cinematography certificates.

Camera operators require excellent hand-eye coordination combined with an artistic flair to obtain the shots each unique scene demands. Remaining patient and having the endurance to work on a set for long periods of time is a talent that continues to develop over time for camera operators as projects often require long hours of hard work to create the final, perfect product.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median yearly salary of camera operators was $49,080 in 2015. Camera operators are expected to see little growth in the job market from 2014-2024, per the BLS. Job competition will be tough and require camera operators to go to extra lengths in order to secure employment. Cities that are big on entertainment, such as L.A. and NYC, offer the most opportunities for camera operators.

Although postsecondary education isn’t required for this profession, some career hopefuls do take photography courses at colleges, vocational schools or art schools to learn the techniques for composing, creating and preserving visual images. Employment growth of an average level for all occupations, at 3%, was predicted for photographers by the BLS, from 2014-2024. In 2015, the BLS reported an annual median wage of $31,710 for these professionals.

For those who want to be in charge while creating television shows, movies or live theater, working as a producer or director might be appealing. Most of these professionals have bachelor’s degrees and work experience in acting or writing. In 2014, the BLS projected an 9% increase in jobs through 2024, which was faster than the average for all occupations at that time. Producers and directors earned a median annual salary of $68,440 in 2015, according to the BLS.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, camera operators usually hold a bachelor’s degree in film or a similar field. Courses in these programs typically go over the equipment, shooting techniques and the general processes of film shooting. Aspiring camera operators could also go to film school to learn about the artistic or creative aspects of cinematography. In addition, some colleges and universities offer cinematography certificates.

Camera operators require excellent hand-eye coordination combined with an artistic flair to obtain the shots each unique scene demands. Remaining patient and having the endurance to work on a set for long periods of time is a talent that continues to develop over time for camera operators as projects often require long hours of hard work to create the final, perfect product.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median yearly salary of camera operators was $49,080 in 2015. Camera operators are expected to see little growth in the job market from 2014-2024, per the BLS. Job competition will be tough and require camera operators to go to extra lengths in order to secure employment. Cities that are big on entertainment, such as L.A. and NYC, offer the most opportunities for camera operators.

Although postsecondary education isn’t required for this profession, some career hopefuls do take photography courses at colleges, vocational schools or art schools to learn the techniques for composing, creating and preserving visual images. Employment growth of an average level for all occupations, at 3%, was predicted for photographers by the BLS, from 2014-2024. In 2015, the BLS reported an annual median wage of $31,710 for these professionals.

For those who want to be in charge while creating television shows, movies or live theater, working as a producer or director might be appealing. Most of these professionals have bachelor’s degrees and work experience in acting or writing. In 2014, the BLS projected an 9% increase in jobs through 2024, which was faster than the average for all occupations at that time. Producers and directors earned a median annual salary of $68,440 in 2015, according to the BLS.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, camera operators usually hold a bachelor’s degree in film or a similar field. Courses in these programs typically go over the equipment, shooting techniques and the general processes of film shooting. Aspiring camera operators could also go to film school to learn about the artistic or creative aspects of cinematography. In addition, some colleges and universities offer cinematography certificates.

Camera operators require excellent hand-eye coordination combined with an artistic flair to obtain the shots each unique scene demands. Remaining patient and having the endurance to work on a set for long periods of time is a talent that continues to develop over time for camera operators as projects often require long hours of hard work to create the final, perfect product.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median yearly salary of camera operators was $49,080 in 2015. Camera operators are expected to see little growth in the job market from 2014-2024, per the BLS. Job competition will be tough and require camera operators to go to extra lengths in order to secure employment. Cities that are big on entertainment, such as L.A. and NYC, offer the most opportunities for camera operators.

Although postsecondary education isn’t required for this profession, some career hopefuls do take photography courses at colleges, vocational schools or art schools to learn the techniques for composing, creating and preserving visual images. Employment growth of an average level for all occupations, at 3%, was predicted for photographers by the BLS, from 2014-2024. In 2015, the BLS reported an annual median wage of $31,710 for these professionals.

14
Northspur

Alvin Arnold

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17